ADA Handrails

What are ADA Handrails?

ADA Handrails are made of steel or another metal and are installed along the edges of any raised surface or along the sides of certain ramps and walkways to ensure ADA Compliance. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) passed in 1990 requires these handrails be installed in certain instances in order to ensure the safety of all users.

Why are ADA Handrails Important?

ADA Handrails are important because they are required by the ADA to prevent disabled people from rolling off the edge of elevated surfaces. They also provide stability to users of a ramp

How are ADA Handrails Installed?

ADA Handrails are installed in one of two ways. The handrails may be surface mounted to the ramp or walkway through brackets bolted directly into the surface of the material they are supported by. Handrails can also be cored and installed within the concrete of a ramp. Handrails are welded to ADA specifications including height, secondary rails, and end-pieces that are required to extend a certain distance beyond the length of the walkway or the ramp.

REQUEST A QUOTE

What are ADA Handrails?

ADA Handrails are made of steel or another metal and are installed along the edges of any raised surface or along the sides of certain ramps and walkways to ensure ADA Compliance. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) passed in 1990 requires these handrails be installed in certain instances in order to ensure the safety of all users.

Why are ADA Handrails Important?

ADA Handrails are important because they are required by the ADA to prevent disabled people from rolling off the edge of elevated surfaces. They also provide stability to users of a ramp

How are ADA Handrails Installed?

ADA Handrails are installed in one of two ways. The handrails may be surface mounted to the ramp or walkway through brackets bolted directly into the surface of the material they are supported by. Handrails can also be cored and installed within the concrete of a ramp. Handrails are welded to ADA specifications including height, secondary rails, and end-pieces that are required to extend a certain distance beyond the length of the walkway or the ramp.