ADA Handicap Ramps

Providing adequate accessibility to individuals with disabilities is fundamentally necessary to all Property Managers. This service includes ensuring wheelchair ramps have proper handrails, resistance, slope, clearance width and edging. These ramps require warning surfaces to meet ADA requirements.

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What are ADA Handicap Ramps?

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) passed in 1990 requires that all public commercial properties (and some common areas of residential areas such as clubhouses or pools) maintain an open access policy with regards to disabled individuals in wheelchairs. One of the easiest and most common ways this is accomplished is through the use of ADA Handicap Ramps at all entrances wherever stairs or elevation changes are present. ADA Handicap Ramps come in two different shapes: flared and perpendicular. Perpendicular ramps are flat with the transitional surface, and ramp up at 90 degree angles from the entryway. Flared ramps are ramped up with the transitional surface, with 45 degree “wings” that flare up on either side of the ramp

Why are ADA Handicap Ramps Important?

ADA Handicap Ramps are important because they provide an alternate way to access a building or common area to peoples with disabilities. These ramps have a specific slope of 1:12 and other requirements that conform to the ADA Code. For example, if the ramp is longer than 12′, it requires that a landing be established at regular intervals. In addition, handrails may be required depending on length and slope

How are ADA Handicap Ramps Installed or Repaired?

ADA Handicap Ramps’ installation or repairs is dependent upon what is currently on-site. For example, if there is currently a ramp on the property that is not up to ADA Compliance, the existing ramp may need to be removed and a new one installed. Depending on the dimensions of what is being removed, installing a new ADA compliant ramp may require additional services such as asphalt repairs

If there is a currently an ADA compliant ramp on-site, ramp repairs proceed similar to the installation of a regular concrete ramp, except the slope is predetermined by the ADA Code